Monday, May 25, 2009

Wear and Tear

Wear and tear. The progressive damage caused by repetitive movements. This is not the main topic of Doug McGuff's talk here but it is one that is really important to me now. I'm 41 and being injury free is now very important. Professionally I can't afford days off right now. Yet I sometimes think that some of my training over the years how damaged me rather than protected me.



I don't want to get all wimpy and scared of movement, but I do want to be aware of the positive and negatives.

12 comments:

Noel said...

Can someone with BBS describe the evidence they have to assert that training once a week is the most effective frequency? The studies I have found (good meta-analysis here) suggest 2-3 times per week is optimal.

Bill Fox said...

I was a certified super slow trainer back in the day. I've been training for 30+ years. Experience demonstrates that every really fit 60+ year old guy I've ever known was a "daily" trainer - kata, running, pushups etc...the guys that work out once a week are just old and fat.

theorytopractice said...

Chris,
Ahhh, the age-old dilemma; shall I pursue health, or the thrill of competition? (and that includes competition w/myself). Once you get this figured out, give me a shout, eh? :)

Bill,
I think the key is to mix intermittent, high intensity work with daily doses of low and moderate intensity stuff (i.e., power law; fractal in nature). It's a yin-yang thing, not an all or nothing proposition. That's my take, at least.

Asclepius said...

"..the key is to mix intermittent, high intensity work with daily doses of low and moderate intensity stuff (i.e., power law; fractal in nature). It's a yin-yang thing, not an all or nothing proposition..."

Absolutely correct. the only thing I would add is to just make sure you get good sleep, good nutrition and listen to your body when it tells you to rest.

Rannoch Donald said...

One of the most basic yet effective ways to achieve, maintain and promote resilience is to stop thinking of training and start thinking of practice.

Superior movement should take precedence over strength and muscle mass. At a certain point the weight on the bar becomes the limiting factor. Where as someone whose practice has purpose beyond their training will constantly find ways to challenge themselves without damaging themselves.

R

Chris said...

Thanks for the comments guys

Anonymous said...

how does this wear and tear applies to kettlebell training? does this means that doing swings is going to be a bad thing in the future?. nice blog you have Sr. hope we can get in touch, thank you for your time. hi from Mexico!!!!

Chris said...

Bill

I see what you say, but there may be more to it - i.e. we don't see the "graveyard" - those that have become injured through their training and have given up before they reach 60+. Those that you point to may be particularly or unusually resilient? They are the exceptions who have managed to survive as trainers through to that age? We always make the mistake of trying to correlate how people look / perform with how they train.

Chris said...

Anon re kettlebell training, I am becoming less enthusiastic about the idea of hundreds of reps or swings or snatches. I think that may be overuse.

Rannoch Donald said...

chris,

Let me know when you are around. At 47 my focus is staying injury free, then comes the practice. I'd love to talk with you about some stuff I am putting together.

Less is more.

R

Chris said...

Hi Rannoch

I should be about next week when this election is out the way......

Rannoch Donald said...

Good stuff. There is a fantastic tool kit here but like they say, when all you use is a hammer everything looks like a nail.

It's taken me a number of years and a host of injuries to find a sustainable yet enjoyable practice. the enjoyable part cannot be underplayed. As much as we can "suck it up" and get on with it, if it's challenging and fun we find our selves sticking with it. It's the art and the science. Just what we need!