Sunday, March 31, 2013

People don't trust fat doctors

This one raised a smile when I saw the abstract:



Respondents reported more mistrust of physicians who are overweight or obese, were less inclined to follow their medical advice, and were more likely to change providers if the physician was perceived to be overweight or obese, compared to normal-weight physicians who elicited significantly more favorable reactions. These weight biases remained present regardless of participants’ own body weight.

I suppose it makes sense.  Why follow their advice if they are unable to achieve something in their own bodies.

How does this apply to other areas like fitness or diet gurus?  I think this is where it gets more complex.  I think a diet guru who is promoting a certain approach as leading to health or leanness should really be healthy and lean.  However in terms of fitness, the 6-pack is not always a sign that they know what they are doing.  Favourable genetics and chemical assistance can often deliver a decent physique despite the particular approach to training.  Looking good doesn't mean that you know what you are talking about.....but if you know what you are talking about you should at least look decent.

12 comments:

Stuart Gilbert said...

Unfortunately here is where the problem lies in the fitness industry. Image often wins out over substance. People will gravitate towards seeking advice from someone with "the look" those infomercials and celebrity fitness DVD's spring to mind. This is in spite of the fact that the look is more often than not a product of favourable genetics and / or "supplementation" rather than in depth knowledge and application of sound training principles. People seek advice from others with completely different body types, circumstances and tolerances to training, hoping to morph into a similar body type to their advisor. These unrealistic expectations are fed by the fitness industry, as expectations lead to money being spent in pursuit of dreams. It really is a paradox.

Inverter said...

thanks blog

Ondřej Tureček said...

Doctors usually don't have that much "room" to focus on health. Irregular sleep, lack of sleep, poor dietary choices when you have 10min to eat, this results in decreased desire to exercise, stress...the combination of HIT and real food could work for them, but many doctors aren't familiar with benefits of WT, running is more popular, as there is some momentum in trends, most doctors are running around with sporttesters or walk.
That said, most of surgeons work out, I think. I know for sure the most famous czech cardio surgeon does, but he also runs and does cross country...
Also the most famous plastic surgeon - kind of a national celebrity who participates in MISS competitions etc. - has his own hand-made dumbbells, my mother told me, it was on TV..suddenly my weight training is seen in a positive light at home:-)

Anonymous said...

I don't see the problem here. Since it turns out that being fat isn't ipso facto unhealthy, more fat doctors would appear to translate to fewer doctors inclined to badger their patients about their weight.

MAS said...

Dr. Regina Benjamin, enough said.

Ondřej Tureček said...

I have to say that recently all the low-carb/paleo blogs really started to disgust me.

Reading blogs where doctors(!) say "It's not the chair that caused obesity, it's sugar! our readers arent stupid brainwashed sheep! Coca-cola is evil!" Are you kidding me? And a year ago I though this was the truth...
I am ok when a triathlete misses the point, when weight trainer is enthusiastic about a study he doesn't understand...but doctors?
Fortunately most of the doctors spread the message that would make Matt Stone proud, but it's not sexy, so it's very hard to persuade typical "I just found a nice english sciencey blog with lot of studies and sexy recipes so I wont be ill again" conventional wisdom fighter.

Suzie_B said...

Why would people judge doctors differently than they judge everybody else?

Mark said...

If doctors and patients had the time to develop substantive relationships, perhaps real communication could occur, and the patient could learn about the overweight doctor's own struggles, and why he/she is making particular recommendations. But that doesn't happen unless the patient has the resources to break free of the insurance-driven health care machine.

Anonymous said...

That's why I don't listen to Neil de Grasse Tyson when he says diets are simple, it's calories in calories out. He's fat, so his opinion doesn't count. There are immutable laws, he's right about that.

Anonymous said...

So would Bill Belichick make a great NFL QB? No? Okay....linebacker? No? Yet he is widely considered a top tier coach. Who cares what the person looks like if they are giving life saving information. "Be kind to others for you never know what battles they may face."

Ever seen Dr. Andrew Weil and his buddha belly? Is this a reflection of him or do people see through it an accept the information.

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Physical Therapy upper saddle river said...

Over weight can be very harmful. We should do proper treatment of the disease. I think physical therapy is best cure then others to get fitness.