Monday, January 21, 2008

Kettlebell Windmill - is this functional?

I've been trying to master this exercise recently for the "core" strength and balance it brings. Really hits the hamstrings too and promotes shoulder stability. Or so I am told...

However, one question I have is "is this functional?" I am trying to think through whether this has an real world application. I am thinking that it does - not that this is an everyday movement pattern, but that it strengthens aspects of everyday patterns and adds stability and balance....Any ideas?

First of all demonstrated by Anthony DiLuglio:



Then by Steve Cotter

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

The first rule of functional exercises: if you have to ask if it is, it isn't. There are a lots better ways to train those muscles without risking shoulder damage. Either rings or a fitness ball would be a better choice. But they aren't a trendy as KBs.

Chris said...

I known what you mean re that rule. However I think there are functional bits to this - bending and twisting movements really.

Surely fitness balls are trendy too?

Anonymous said...

I find that people confuse functioonal moves with everyday moves. A functional move doesn't have to replicate an everyday move, otherwise we'd all be sitting and typing and clicking. A functional move is a an action that involves a large amount of muscles and generally involves the core. So, yes the windmill is functional.

Chris said...

Thanks for the comment. I suppose I am still searching for a good definition of "functional"

Oliver said...

Hi, just wanted to give my 2 cents about windmills and functionality. 1) I think functionality as term is dependent on the context of use. For most normal people doing normal stuff I think a deadlift would be more 'functional' than a windmill, but for a judo practitioner I think they are about the same. 2) Being strong in the entirety of your range of motion also bleeds through to more 'normal', aka. less exaggerated movements. Finally 3) shoulder stabilisation through lattisimus tension is very beneficially to almost all other lifts, so that is a pretty functional (in the sense of 'carries of well to other (for you) common movements) exercise. Regarding the danger of hurting the shoulder, behind the neck presses are far more used and a far more dangerous exercise. Best wishes

Chris said...

thanks Oliver - good points

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