Thursday, August 20, 2009

Eat a carb free diet and you make your own glucose...

Gluconeogenesis - is a metabolic pathway that results in the generation of glucose from non-carbohydrate carbon substrates such as lactate, glycerol, and glucogenic amino acids.

So if you don't eat carbs, you body can still make the sugar you need to survive....

This study looked at why a high protein low carb diet incereases your resting metabolic rate....and explains much of the increase as accounted for by gluconeogenesis.

Draw some conclusions.......

Gluconeogenesis and energy expenditure after a high-protein, carbohydrate-free diet

Background: High-protein diets have been shown to increase energy expenditure (EE).

Objective: The objective was to study whether a high-protein, carbohydrate-free diet (H diet) increases gluconeogenesis and whether this can explain the increase in EE.

Design: Ten healthy men with a mean (±SEM) body mass index (in kg/m2) of 23.0 ± 0.8 and age of 23 ± 1 y received an isoenergetic H diet (H condition; 30%, 0%, and 70% of energy from protein, carbohydrate, and fat, respectively) or a normal-protein diet (N condition; 12%, 55%, and 33% of energy from protein, carbohydrate, and fat, respectively) for 1.5 d according to a randomized crossover design, and EE was measured in a respiration chamber. Endogenous glucose production (EGP) and fractional gluconeogenesis were measured via infusion of [6,6-2H2]glucose and ingestion of 2H2O; absolute gluconeogenesis was calculated by multiplying fractional gluconeogenesis by EGP. Body glycogen stores were lowered at the start of the intervention with an exhaustive glycogen-lowering exercise test.

Results: EGP was lower in the H condition than in the N condition (181 ± 9 compared with 226 ± 9 g/d; P < 0.001), whereas fractional gluconeogenesis was higher (0.95 ± 0.04 compared with 0.64 ± 0.03; P < 0.001) and absolute gluconeogenesis tended to be higher (171 ± 10 compared with 145 ± 10 g/d; P = 0.06) in the H condition than in the N condition. EE (resting metabolic rate) was greater in the H condition than in the N condition (8.46 ± 0.23 compared with 8.12 ± 0.31 MJ/d; P < 0.05). The increase in EE was a function of the increase in gluconeogenesis (EE = 0.007 x gluconeogenesis – 0.038; r = 0.70, R2 = 0.49, P < 0.05). The contribution of gluconeogenesis to EE was 42%; the energy cost of gluconeogenesis was 33% (95% CI: 16%, 50%).

Conclusions: Forty-two percent of the increase in energy expenditure after the H diet was explained by the increase in gluconeogenesis. The cost of gluconeogenesis was 33% of the energy content of the produced glucose.

2 comments:

Vagn said...

what the ....

So there really is an metabolic advantage to low-carb eating (8.12 to 8.46 is 4.2%)

Or should that be no-carb?

Chris said...

So it seems