Wednesday, October 7, 2009

lateral box jumps......

indulging my interest in big jumps....

5 comments:

dangoldberg33 said...

I think box jumps, when done to increase performance, are about moving your center of mass quickly. This means that the squat depth you use to take off the ground with would be the lowest depth you have when you make contact with the top of the box. If you jump in a quarter squat and land at the absolute bottom of a squat, then your only demonstrating your ability to jump half that height as well as you ability to quickly flex your hips.

I'm really just regurgitating the opinions of strength coaches like Mike Boyle and Jim Radcliffe (Strength and Conditioning coach at Oregon University). However, I also agree with them.

Paleo Garden said...

I made a couple of these boxes. One of the things I do with my children (carefully) is allow them to walk along the top of a rock fence and we jump off certain parts of it. Only a couple feet drop. Amazing how much more agile they are than other children who are only allowed to walk on the sidewalks.

John Sifferman said...

Sonnon is at it again :)

There is something to be said about jump training translating into more agility. For one thing, it serves as a practical skill for transferring elastic energy - quite different from the "grinding" strength that is most formally taught.

Kids should definitely be encouraged to jump and play freely when in the backyard, at the playground, or when just walking to school.

dangoldberg33 said...

I hate to be a stick in the mud but the NSCA recommends that children never do depth jumps. I'm just trying to be helpful and I know personally that I would want to know a fact like that if I were training children.

The risk of fracturing a growth plate is highest when doing depth jumps in comparison to any other type of plyometric drill.

John Sifferman said...

Dan,

That's a very valid and important point. I wouldn't recommend depth jumps for young children at all.

Children should be allowed to jump and play FREELY - not put through a series of drills for conditioning purposes. As they become teenagers, and finish most of their growing, more standardized training practices can be introduced.

I'd highly recommend looking into the International Youth Conditioning Association for those who are interested in this type of information.