Thursday, March 11, 2010

Every workout matters....

This post links back to one I made in January:

your most recent workout is the most important....and stay low carb

in that one I pointed out research that each workout was important, each session had an immediate impact on making you healthier. It is not just an ongoing state that you are creating....but also you are benefitting from each time you train (with certain caveats).

Anyway I saw this study today and it seems to indicate similar things: the conclusion is that :

These results demonstrate an important mechanism by which each individual exercise session may incrementally reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women.
It is there again, every session matters...everyone has an impact. As was pointed out in comments on the last post, this is motivational. What you do in this immediate workout will have a benefit...it will make you healthier.

Here is the abstract:

Plasma triglyceride concentrations are rapidly reduced following individual bouts of endurance exercise in women.

t is known that chronic endurance training leads to improvements in the lipoprotein profile, but less is known about changes that occur during postexercise recovery acutely. We analyzed triglyceride (TG), cholesterol classes and apolipoproteins in samples collected before, during and after individual moderate- and hard-intensity exercise sessions in men and women that were isoenergetic between intensities. Young healthy men (n = 9) and young healthy women (n = 9) were studied under three different conditions with diet unchanged between trials: (1) before, during and 3 h after 90 min of exercise at 45% VO(2)peak (E45); (2) before, during and 3 h after 60 min of exercise at 65% VO(2)peak (E65), and (3) in a time-matched sedentary control trial (C). At baseline, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was higher in women than men (P < 0.05). In men and in women, total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), HDL-C, apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), apolipoprotein B (apoB), and LDL peak particle size were unaltered by exercise either during exertion or after 3 h of recovery. In women, but not in men, average plasma TG was significantly reduced below C at 3 h postexercise by approximately 15% in E45 and 25% in E65 (P < 0.05) with no significant difference between exercise intensities. In summary, plasma TG concentration rapidly declines following exercise in women, but not in men. These results demonstrate an important mechanism by which each individual exercise session may incrementally reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in women.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

What does this tell us about long-term effects of the increments? Do the TG come back? By how much?

With only reading the abstract, I am not sure that this says anything about a cumulative effect of exercising.

Drs. Cynthia and David said...

Thanks for the heads up. I guess it really is important to be consistent with your exercise.

There are numerous papers in pubmed showing that the same occurs in men, and also correlating HDL, LDL, etc (even subtypes like HDL-2c), and seeing what happens with de-training. Something about increased lipoprotein lipase activity (to get the fatty acids into muscle cells where they are needed for fuel).

Cynthia

jleeger said...

Great info, thanks for posting!